writing advice

I’m Back!

Posted on Updated on

Firstly, apologies for the gap in posting. I’ve been dealing with a lack of internet making life difficult, and then went on holiday. I’ve just come back from the Isle of Wight yesterday.

It was a good trip, though like every year I’ve had the C-word (coursework) hanging over me preventing me from truly being able to relax. Still I enjoyed seeing the countryside, doing some tourist-y stuff, and was even inspired for two stories–neither of which I am going to give a lot of detail on now, but I will say that one was inspired by the Garlic Farm and the other by Carisbrooke Castle*.

I didn’t manage to write any more poetry, but then when I do write poetry it seems to come in batches–I go through a phase of it coming easily to me, and then for ages without anything. That’s writing, I guess. I recently managed to make some headway on Crossfire, totalling my chapters written from one and a half to two and a half-ish (I know–sounds abundant!). I have a long to-do list for that novel (series) of things like names that I haven’t decided on yet. It’s a bit of a hinder, though I suppose the constant coursework doesn’t help either …

Still, I’m hoping to have my current essay (well the essay’s done, it’s the annotated bibliography that’s taking my energy now) done by August, and my second essay done by the time I see my friends from my old church at Westpoint, leaving me free to enjoy the summer … in September.

Now my internet’s sorted I think I’ll hunt down some more poetry competitions/anthologies to submit to, see if I can graduate with an impressive CV–after all, my illness has prevented me from partaking in extra-curricular stuff, so a list of publications can only help my job prospects! I’d love to enter fiction competitions as well, but am rarely inspired by prompts, and for open things I just don’t know what to submit. I just don’t have the energy to invest in writing something suitable; apart from Reasons to Sing, which was written specifically for the anthology, I just enter a poem I’ve already written.

I have a feeling I’ve entered Let Them Eat Cake into a competition somewhere, but I can’t remember if, when or where. Better not send that one anywhere till I know for certain!

Pin of the week:
the-only-12-1-2-writing-rules-you-ll-ever-need

*I say inspired by, it was more that the visit reminded me of one of my childhood daydreams and I realised it would make a good children’s book.

Write What You Read?

Posted on Updated on

I’ve heard and read lots of writing advice, and many people say to write what you know. Also, many people say that to be a (good) writer you have to read a lot. I don’t think I’ve heard this as an actual quote, but it’s been implied, that you write what you read (like, ‘you are what you eat’).

To contest that, I’ve met many writers who struggle to find the time to read. I myself struggle to read even the required reading for my course, so when I finish a novel I’ve been reading for pleasure, it’s a pretty big deal. Contrast that to my childhood when I devoured book after book and got into trouble for reading under the desk at school. For me, the telly is an alternative that requires less effort to enjoy since it’s more passive.

Of course to an extend I think how much you get out of reading depends what you’re trying to write. In terms of format, I write prose but it’s been commented that my dialogue is quite script-like, which could be because I ‘read’ (watch) more scripts than I read prose. Since I want to be a scriptwriter, and I’ve got pretty good feedback for prose in this style, I’m not going to worry too much, though I would like to read a lot more than I do–I have so many book samples on my Kindle awaiting reading.

Genre, I think, is a more interesting one. This is all just my opinion, I am by no means saying any writers should take my word as law, but I think it is possible to write in a genre you don’t really read–although it comes with limitations. I should explain.

For a case study, take one of my novels (a work in progress), Shadow Charge. Unlike my other novel WIP, Crossfire, SC is I think pretty difficult to define as a genre. I think the closest possible descriptive would be supernatural whodunit. But on its own that doesn’t sum it up. I would say that SC is part whodunit, part ghost story, part time travel, part psychological thriller, with a touch of romance, and that description is subject to some altering between now and publication (which is not foreseeable for some years). Out of all those genre labels, I don’t read very many. Take psychological thrillers, for example. I don’t make a habit of reading them because many of them freak me out a bit. The same with ghost stories. While I have not read many whodunits, I have watched countless ones on television so I am familiar with tropes and so forth (though I have read two Agatha Christies and one Conan Doyle to date, so I’m not doing too badly).

What’s my point? Well I won’t know for certain till the novel is at a point where I get a lot of feedback on it, but the way the plot has played out I think it works–if I can iron out the wrinkles. Because the novel is such a blend of genres–when I got the initial idea, I would have called it a fantasy, but it has since become apparent that despite its links to my fantasy novel, the actual story is very different–being fluent in its genre(s) is not so vital, because it’s something new. That’s not to say I won’t continue to persue reading more whodunit etc novels. Though I have yet to come across someone who’s had an idea quite like mine. (If you know of something that crosses all those genres, please do tell me, I’d be interested to read it.) On the other hand, I would not dare to try and write a straight romance or straight psychological thriller before becoming fluent in the genre first–I don’t believe I would have the tools to make it a great, stand-out story that way.

So, some food for thought. Do any writers reading this write ‘blended’ genres? How much experience do you reckon you need for each? Please do comment, I’d love to hear your thoughts.